A Day in the Life of a Recruiter

People sometimes wonder what recruiters do day-to-day, so we asked one of our best: Martin Graham, Senior Recruiter here at WTS Energy. Martin has been with us for 5 years as a recruiter and has over 47 years in the oil & gas world. As a former technical director at Shell, he knows all the ins and outs of the industry. Martin has successfully placed countless candidates ranging from offshore technicians to CEO’s, because of his experience and expertise in the oil and gas industry, Martin is able to match the best candidates to the best job positions.

 

So what does your day look like Martin?

 

06:45

I wake up and check unanswered emails that came in overnight and require immediate action, this usually determines a general roadmap for my day. I then  put on my running shoes to go for a morning jog around the Dubai marina. After that I return home to share a breakfast with my lovely wife before leaving for the office in sunny Dubai.

 

09:00

-”Martin always comes into the office with a hearty “Good Morning” and a cup of black coffee”- says one colleague.

 

09:05

Juggling my coffee and an apple, I then turn on my PC and discuss the to-do list with my colleagues: Vinay and Asifa, with whom I share a desk. Today we need to call our recent candidates to prepare them for their upcoming interviews with a potential employer.

 

10:30

I log onto linkedin and answer any inmail responses I sent out the day before. Today, a candidate would like a followup meeting on a job proposition I sent him. Another candidate would like to inquire about any new opportunities that I may be aware of, something that matches his credentials (an email I receive frequently). I will also initiate a search for a field manager for one of our clients in Dubai.

 

11:30

I get a skype call from the Netherlands (where the work day just started) to discuss a new position that needs to be filled. My supervisor and I spend half an hour discussing the ideal candidate for the job; what qualifications does the candidate need? What transferable skills are required? What kind of company culture should the candidate be accustomed to? What are the terms and conditions being offered? Anything that could steer me on the right path to finding the perfect match.

 

12:00

The review took a little longer than expected, but I carry on sourcing new candidates and contact former candidates we have worked with.

 

12:50

It’s lunch time – I take a walk to the supermarket on the corner and order a sandwich and some fresh fruit. I then come back to the office and talk to my other colleagues about life outside work. It’s good to hear how others spend their weekend, I might learn about some new restaurants or upcoming events.

 

13:28

Ok, time to get behind my computer and find a candidate for a position I’m handling for a client. The role of “Pipeline Project Manager” is a difficult position to fill, the candidate needs to be of senior level (something that is rare in today’s industry), needs to be willing to relocate to the Kurdistan, and needs management expertise. I begin my sourcing process and quickly come across a few candidates that come close, but having worked at Shell in the past, I know the right technical background is important, even at a management position.

 

14:32

After diving into our own database, I found a candidate that meets the requirements, has managerial experience, has a degree in mechanical engineering, and extensive pipeline experience. Time to get in touch with him. Although it seems like I’ve found the ideal candidate, I’m not sure if he is willing to relocate to Erbil or will agree to the compensation package. Halfway there though, I’ve left him a voicemail so I’ll pick up on this tomorrow.

 

14:47

I have a meeting with a former candidate that is now in charge of HR at his company. He would like to discuss a new collaboration with WTS Energy. Good to see a candidate doing well at work. A candidate becoming a client later on through his career is one of the reasons why it is essential to stay in touch with any placements I’ve made in the past.

 

16:06

Finished my meeting, I receive an email from a candidate that has been placed for a project, he needs to sort out the logistics of his relocation. I put him in touch with our amazing operations office, they will take good care of him. I quickly brief them about the candidate’s situation and the project.

 

16:15

I receive a call from a candidate to whom I recently sent an offer, he was expecting a more lucrative salary but has decided to accept the offer anyway. Great! I believe money isn’t everything, when it comes to working in foreign countries, having a great work rotation can be more important than a monumental salary.

 

16:33

My phone rings, I answer and hear that a client needs 24 certified High voltage offshore jointers in the north sea, in 2 weeks… No problem?

 

17:11

Phone rings again, a candidate who had a job interview is asking for an “update”. I tell him that the client is not finished interviewing all the candidates but I’ll let him know as soon as I know more.

 

17:15

I still need to tell the other recruiters in the Netherlands that we need 24 jointers who are needed for a wind farm project in the North Sea. Hopefully they have not yet left for the day.

 

17:30

Found both Vinay and Asifa, I inform them about the new project and we discuss the best sourcing method for this type of position.

 

18:00

I call a candidate in the U.S whose day has just started, we discuss his recent placement. He’s happy with the new job and thanks me for the great job. Yes! With a smile on my face, I organise my desk, put CV’s and offers in a neat pile, update the to-do list for tomorrow and pack my bag for the day.

 

18:30

Caught in Dubai traffic…

19:00

Still in traffic…

 

19:15

I finally get home I pour myself a glass of vino and enjoy a late dinner with the wife.